Male Cancer Awareness Month highlights need for life insurance

06 June 2008 / by Rebecca Sargent
This June is the 11th annual Everyman Male Cancer Awareness Month and, as it raises awareness of common male cancers like testicular and prostate cancer, it also highlights a need for life insurance.

Throughout June, Everyman aims to link up with some of the top retailers in the country and raise more than £500,000 throughout the month along with raising vital awareness about male cancers.

A new survey by the charity has revealed that British men are ignorant about the cancers they are most likely to develop. In fact, 70 per cent of those questioned guesstimated that around 17,000 men were diagnosed with the diseases each year, when in reality it is 35,000.

Spokesperson for the Everyman Male Cancer Campaign, Krista Eleftheriou, said: "It's shocking that there is such ignorance about such a prolific disease. The number of men who die from prostate cancer every year is almost comparable to the number of women who die from breast cancer, yet it remains a taboo subject that is rarely spoken about."

Consequently, The Co-operative Insurance is urging men and women to look at the life assurance plans available in order to protect themselves against such life-altering occurrences.

One aspect of life insurance which could prove invaluable in the event of a cancer diagnosis is critical illness cover which offers a lump sum after diagnosis of certain conditions which usually include cancer. The money can then be used for anything from mortgage repayments to medical care.

Critical illness insurance can also be combined with life cover, meaning that if a claim is made on the critical illness plan, a claim can also be made on the life cover.

Head of protection at The Co-operative Insurance, Fiona Jackson, said: "It is so important for both men and women to evaluate their financial needs should disaster strike. Early death or serious illness can hit the healthiest of us at any time with difficult decisions and financial considerations often being left to family and friends to sort out.

© Fair Investment Company Ltd