Barclay's stockbrokers' clients make the most of market volitility Go compare with our comparison table

Barclay's stockbrokers' clients make the most of market volitility

16 May 2010 / by Lois Avery

Barclays stockbrokers customers have continued to buy despite market volatility , according to figures released this week.

Banking, oil and gas sector stocks were the most heavily purchased and one  week after the general election, figures from Barclays Stockbrokers showed that there has been a shift in the buy/sell ratio of equity trades. 

Clients reacted to current market conditions, seeing it as an investment opportunity. In recent weeks the buy/sell ratio has been around 58 per cent but on  Monday 10 May this figure spiked to a high of 65 per cent with banking, oil and gas sector stocks being among the most heavily purchased.

And on Wednesday 12 May, as the political picture became clearer, the buy to sell ratio peaked  further to the buy side at 67 per cent as investors appeared to welcome the improved clarity around the UK political picture.

Barbara-Ann King, head of investments at Barclays Stockbrokers, said: "We are seeing market volatility continue and therefore influencing our client trading trends. Yesterday morning the FTSE-100 initially opened slightly lower, but recovered quickly suggesting that markets realise the hard work is just starting in tackling the UK's economic and political problems. 

“Taking a broader look at the FTSE-100 it really has been a roller-coaster ride recently for the UK's main equity index. 

“Leading up to the election, we saw the FTSE 100 fall from a high of 5,553 on Friday 30 April down to 5,073 and is currently sitting at around 5,400. These market conditions are clearly influencing client trading behaviour and resulting in the uplift that we are seeing in the buy/sell ratio of our equity trading.”

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